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Graduate Level Fellowship in Global Nutrition and Food Security

Sight and Life (SAL) is offering graduate level fellowships to a small number of candidates who combine solid academic credentials with curiosity, creativity, and passion for social impact.

Internship Objectives:

The Fellow will learn how to develop innovative solutions to improve nutrition and food security in resource-poor settings through cross-sector and multidisciplinary approaches involving nutrition, agriculture, business, environmental science, information technology, and other fields. The Fellow will also learn how business development teams engage with partners, donors, and investors. Topics to be explored include child stunting and enabling national and regional markets to sustainably produce affordable nutritious foods.

Benefit to Intern:

Opportunity to help develop effective, innovative nutrition approaches based on public-private partnerships and other approaches, with practical training and experience in academic collaboration and business development.   

Skills to be Developed and/or Expanded during Internship:

Developing concept notes, writing literature reviews, working with a team on international public health issues, and developing innovative nutrition approaches into fundable scopes.

Proposed activities:

Assist the SAL team in designing effective nutrition solutions for resource-poor settings by conducting literature reviews, refining ideas with potential collaborators and funding agencies, and collaborating on writing papers and concept notes. Identify and prioritize funding opportunities. Fellow will gain exposure to staff, collaborators, and funding agencies.

Stipend:

Up to USD 1,000 per month, depending on dedication and other factors. Hours per week: 20-40 (dependent on student course load).

Term:

Four to five months (August-December 2017)

Location:

Anywhere in North America or Europe.

Required Skills:  

Strong analytical, research, and writing skills. Experience conducting literature reviews and synthesizing articles. Ability to work both independently and as a team member.

Required Experience:

Postdoctoral researcher, doctoral degree candidate, recent graduate or graduate student in global health, nutrition, epidemiology, agricultural economics, business, environmental science, or related field, with at least 1-2 years of experience in carrying out formative research, interpreting qualitative and quantitative data, technical/scientific writing, or similar relevant activities. International project experience, particularly in developing countries, is highly desirable.

Please send cover letter and resume to peiman.milani [@] sightandlife.org by August 22.

Download all the details here.

About Sight and Life:

Sight and Life (SAL) is a humanitarian nutrition think tank working to innovate in nutrition towards eradicating all forms of malnutrition in children and women of childbearing age, and so improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable populations. SAL aims to create unique value in the nutrition sphere by linking nutrition knowledge and research with implementation towards achieving scale.  Our work spans identifying factors that affect nutritional status to engaging on innovative solutions with other actors including agriculture, education, social protection, WASH and the private sector. This knowledge does not translate easily to practical application and implementation on the ground. SAL’s unique expertise aims to fill gaps in knowledge in nutritional science and implementation, build capacity (functional and leadership) and integrate nutrition across other sectors through effective transformative partnering.  

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We welcome our new edition of the Sight and Life magazine focusing on food culture.

In this issue, we have curated contributions that explore the social and cultural domains of food choices and food experiences more broadly. We acknowledge that this is only part of the story. We promise to explore cognition (psychology, brain) and biology (evolution, genes, biochemistry) – factors that also drive food choices – in a future issue of the magazine. For some of our readers trained in biology or chemistry, culture may seem a fuzzy, perhaps non-scientific, topic. Be assured, however, that culture is as much part of nutrition as are biology, biochemistry, chemistry, and genes, and there is a rich body of research on nutrition and culture. 

Please enjoy perusing this issue of Sight and Life magazine with a curious mind, with a view to learning more about how a cultural perspective can enrich your nutrition research and programs.

Visit the resources page to find the complete issue and each individual article for downloading. The past editions of the Sight and Life magazine are available in resources

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Our latest supplement with the World Food Programme is full of information regarding rice fortification in Latin America. This comprehensive overview explains why fortifying rice with micronutrients can be part of an affordable, effective strategy to increase the intake of essential vitamins and minerals to reduce the prevalence of micronutrient malnutrition.

The supplement is available in English and Spanish. Visit the resources page to find the complete supplement and country profiles referenced in the publication for downloading. The past supplements are available in resources

 

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The Society for Implementation Science in Nutrition (SISN) hosted its first live webinar in June of 2017 entitled “An Integrative Framework for Implementation Science in Nutrition” presented by President, Dr. David Pelletier and moderated by Dr. Eva Monterrosa, Secretary and Treasurer of SISN and Sight and Life’s very own Scientific Manager. 

Whether you’re a researcher, policy-maker, front-line implementer or nutrition student, this webinar promotes a common understanding of core concepts in implementation science. It provides an integrative framework for implementation science and classification scheme for distinguishing among the many different forms and purposes of implementation while highlighting the need for implementers and researchers to collaborate to achieve impact-at-scale.

View the complete webinar by clicking HERE

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Maternal undernutrition continues to threaten maternal and child health – particularly in low income and food insecure environments. Despite recent progress, over 30 million babies are still born too small— putting them at an increased risk of infant mortality, childhood stunting and poor cognitive function later in life. Approximately six million of these births are associated with maternal short stature in pregnancy. Low maternal BMI and poor weight gain during pregnancy are other factors that lead to fetal growth restriction. While the importance of the first 1,000 days is widely known, there has been little attention given to a woman’s nutritional status during and following pregnancy. To address this, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation convened a group of experts to explore how to best meet the nutritional requirements of vulnerable women during pregnancy and lactation.
 
The consultation set out to capture considerations and consensus for ready-to-use food supplements for pregnant and lactating women who are undernourished and/or at risk of undernutrition in low and middle-income countries. In their report, the expert group assess the daily minimum and maximum macro- and micronutrient consumption amounts for this target demographic—drawing upon recommendations from the US Institute of Medicine, the Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization (WHO). The group considered the types of foods that can best deliver these nutrients, and consideration of different formats including spreads, biscuits, bars, extruded snacks and instant drink powders. Lastly, they assessed the roles that the public and private sectors could play to create access to and demand for nutritional food supplements during and after pregnancy. The group concluded that both sectors will have an important role to play in moving these products from concept to market, and ultimately getting them to the women who need them most.
 
Dr. Klaus Kraemer, Sight and Life’s Managing Director, was part of the expert panel to advance these pressing topics surrounding women’s nutrition. 
 
“This important and timely document provides a blueprint to develop nutritious foods for women of reproductive age in countries with the highest nutritional needs.” – Dr Klaus Kraemer
 
The new WHO antenatal care guidelines —released shortly after the consultation—filled a gap in guidance for supplementation during pregnancy. The new guidelines include a context-specific recommendation for balanced-energy protein supplementation for pregnant women in undernourished populations. This offers an exciting opportunity to develop an affordable, nutritious food supplement for pregnant women that could also be considered for use by postpartum women to support lactation.
 
Now we must put the consultation’s recommendations into action. The group has outlined a series of next steps, including the development and testing of prototypes in different geographies and contexts. The potential for delivering a nutritious food supplement to undernourished populations is significant, and can help drive progress towards achieving the World Health Assembly’s global nutrition targets on anemia and low birth weight. 

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FAO, WHO welcome resolution, leaps forward in galvanising action on nutrition. 

The United Nations General Assembly today agreed a resolution proclaiming the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition from 2016 to 2025.

The resolution aims to trigger intensified action to end hunger and eradicate malnutrition worldwide, and ensure universal access to healthier and more sustainable diets – for all people, whoever they are and wherever they live. It calls on governments to set national nutrition targets for 2025 and milestones based on internationally agreed indicators.

By agreeing to today’s resolution, governments endorsed the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and Framework for Action adopted by the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) in November 2014.

The UN resolution calls upon FAO and WHO to lead the implementation of the Decade of Action on Nutrition, in collaboration with the World Food Programme (WFP), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), and involving coordination mechanisms such as the United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition (SCN) and multi-stakeholder platforms such as the Committee on World Food Security (CFS).

The Framework for Action commits governments to exercise their primary role and responsibility for addressing undernourishment, stunting, wasting, underweight and overweight in children under five years of age, anaemia in women and children – among other micronutrient deficiencies. It also commits them to reverse the rising trends in overweight and obesity and reduce the burden of diet-related noncommunicable diseases in all age groups.

The new resolution invites international partners, civil society, private sector and academia to actively support governments to ensure full implementation of the steps outlined in the Rome Declaration and Framework for Action.

Looking ahead, the text requests the UN Secretary-General, FAO and WHO to provide progress reports to the UN General Assembly every two years.

The resolution is the fruit of almost 2 years of intense negotiations which started in 2014 and involved representatives of FAO and WHO Member Countries. As a first milestone, ministers and top officials from over 170 countries endorsed the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and Framework for action at the Second International Conference on Nutrition (Rome 19-21 November 2014). A second milestone was reached when the governing bodies of FAO and WHO endorsed the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and Framework for Action in 2015.

A third occurred when governments at the UN General Assembly welcomed these developments and agreed to consider next steps

Today’s resolution further enshrines the battle against hunger and all forms of malnutrition in the sustainable development agenda.

Editors note:
Nearly 800 million people remain chronically undernourished and 159 million children under 5 years of age are stunted. Approximately 50 million children under 5 years are wasted, over two billion people suffer from micronutrient deficiencies and 1.9 billion people are affected by overweight of which over 600 million are obese. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing in nearly all countries.

For more information:
2016
Resolution adopted by the UN General Assembly on the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016-2025)

2015
Resolution adopted by the UN General Assembly on the follow-up to the Second International Conference on Nutrition (A/RES/69/310)

Resolution adopted by the FAO Conference on the outcome of the Second International Conference on Nutrition

Resolution adopted by the WHO World Health Assembly on the outcome of the Second International Conference on Nutrition (WHA68.19)

2014
Rome Declaration on Nutrition adopted at the Second International Conference on Nutrition

Framework for Action adopted at the Second International Conference on Nutrition

 

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Gerda Verburg replaces Tom Arnold, the acting SUN Movement Coordinator

United Nations Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, today announced the appointment of Gerda Verburg of the Netherlands as the Coordinator of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement. The Coordinator will work with 56 country governments that lead the SUN movement, united with UN agencies, civil society, business and donors, in a common mission to defeat malnutrition in all its forms. 

Since 2011, Verburg has served as Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the UN Organizations for Food and Agriculture in Rome (FAO, WFP and IFAD) and in 2014 she was appointed Chair of the Global Agenda Council for Food and Nutrition Security of the World Economic Forum (WEF).  

From 2013 until 2015, Verburg served as Chair of the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS), a multi-stakeholder committee where governments, civil society, private sector, research institutions and others addressed food and nutrition issues.  

From 2007-2011, Verburg served as speaker in the Dutch House of Representatives on economics, energy and innovation and as Minister of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality. In 2008 she was elected Chair of the UN Commission on Sustainable Development.  

“I am delighted to have the opportunity to work with the 56 countries in the SUN Movement, as it enters its sixth year. They are home to over 90 million undernourished children. Our vision is to bring this down to zero.” – Verburg 

Verburg, replaces the acting SUN Movement Coordinator, Tom Arnold, who has Coordinated the Movement from August 2014. Previously, David Nabarro, the UN Secretary General’s Special Advisor on 2030 Agenda and Special Representative for Food Security and Nutrition, coordinated the Movement – helping to establish the powerful driving force for nutrition which it is today.

Click here to learn more about the SUN Movement.

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