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Here at Sight and Life, we believe great leadership is about having a vision of an improved world, acting on that vision and inspiring others to do the same.

We are accepting nominations for individuals striving for a better world and have proven to be a leader in the nutrition field. We will be requesting submissions from our friends, colleagues, and extended networks to submit nominations for eligible candidates to receive the award. Each potential candidate must meet specific requirements.

A good leader is a visionary, not a dreamer: someone who not only dreams and talks about a better world but steps up to realize his vision.

A good leader is innovative and creative: someone who seeks new solutions to a problem and provides the knowledge and methods to take them into action.

A good leader is passionate: someone who is driven by a passion about his or her work to improve the current situation.

A good leader has courage: someone who rises and takes initiative in difficult times.

A transformative leader is an inspiration: someone who inspires, encourages, and helps other people achieving improvement. In this spirit, we proudly announce the 2017 Sight and Life Nutrition Leadership Award.

Please submit your nomination below…

The submissions will be narrowed down to the top five candidates. A committee, which includes past winners, will then determine the recipient of the Sight and Life Nutrition Leadership Award. 

Selection Committee Members:
Dr Klaus Kraemer, Sight and Life
Dr David Nabarro, 2012 Recipient of the SAL Nutrition Leadership Award
Dr Robert Black, 2013 Recipient of the SAL Nutrition Leadership Award
Dr Anna Lartey, 2014 Recipient of the SAL Nutrition Leadership Award
Dr Shawn Baker, 2015 Recipient of the SAL Nutrition Leadership Award

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Join us on Monday, October 16 from 8:00 to 10:00 at the International Congress for Nutrition (ICN) in Argentina for The Biology of the First 1,000 Days book release. For more details on the session click here

Abstract

The first 1,000 days, from conception to two years of age, is a critical period of growth and development. Exposures to dietary, environmental, hormonal, and other stressors during this window have been associated with an increased risk of poor health outcomes, some of which are irreversible. The book, The Biology of the First 1,000 Days, addresses this crucial interval of early life across biological disciplines, linking concepts related to all biological fields to outcomes during the first 1,000 days (e.g. fetal growth and pregnancy outcomes) and beyond (e.g. gut microbiome and cardiovascular disease later in life). The strength of this book lies in its cross-disciplinary nature.

Features

–  Summarizes the importance and irreversible nature of growth and nutrition experienced in the first 1,000 days of life

– Outlines the negative impacts of malnutrition, hormonal stressors, environmental enteropathies, inadequate early growth, and others on later life

– Examines the biology and pathophysiology of the myriad influences on early health and development

– Reviews normal and abnormal fetal and infant development associated with prenatal and postnatal exposures

– Provides suggestions for interventions mitigating poor fetal and early postnatal conditions

Editors

Crystal Karakochuk, PhD, RD
Assistant Professor, Human Nutrition
Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia
Investigator, Healthy Starts, BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute

Kyly Whitfield, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University

Prof Tim Green
Affiliate Professor Discipline of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, School of Medicine, The University of Adelaide

Klaus Kraemer
Director of Sight and Life and Adjunct Professor Johns Hopkins School of Public Health

Reviews

“The Biology of the First 1000 Days compiles the substance behind what we know to be the key to progress. Investing in good nutrition during a child’s first 1000 days is essential for not only unlocking a child’s physical and mental development. It is the way forward for improved health, productivity, income and a sustainable future – with no one left behind. This book compiles our experience, and showcases it for policy makers, strategists and programmers. I hope the knowledge captured in these pages plays an important role in achieving the ultimate goal – an end to malnutrition, in all its forms.”

– Gerda Verburg, Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement Coordinator and UN Assistant Secretary General

“The book is a comprehensive and synthetic review of key spatial factors ranging from preconception to age two— it is a critical reference and will shape public policy and improve interventions for mother and child – impacts that will last a lifetime”

– Emorn Udomkesmalee, Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Thailand

“Nutrition policy accepted that the first 1,000 days are critical for life. Now knowledge about the biology of that critical window – so important for specific policy actions – is provided by this volume. It is essential reading for the nutrition community. The list of contributors reads like a Who is Who in nutrition research.”

– Prof. Joachim von Braun, Bonn University, Vice Chair of the Board of Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN)

“In The Biology of the First 1,000 Days we find, clearly and profoundly, the scientific evidence of how good nutrition truly shapes the future of our world – a most valuable contribution to our understanding of a long-neglected issue.”

– Roger Thurow, author of The First 1,000 Days: A Crucial Time for Mothers and Children – And the World

SAVE 20% when purchasing the book by using promo code FMQ13 here

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Mark your calendar and be sure to attend these IUNS ICN sessions with Sight and Life:

Sunday, October 15 

8:30 – 10:00

Leveraging Food Systems to Improve Food Systems and Nutrition
FAO & Tufts University

Prof. Anna Lartey – Food systems role in achieving goals of the decade of action for nutrition

Prof. Patrick Webb – Nepal: a case for elucidating effective ways to use food systems for improved nutrition

Dr. Klaus Kraemer – Food systems importance for enhancing micronutrient nutrition

Sunday, October 15

11.00 – 13.00

Cracking the Egg Potential to Reduce Child Stunting and Improve Rural Livelihoods
Children’s Investment Fund Foundation

Dr. Chessa Lutter & Dr. Saul Morris – The Lulun Project: results from a randomized controlled trial using eggs to improve linear growth among young children in Ecuador

Dr. Lora Iannotti – Putting our eggs in more than one basket – lessons learned from working with multiple sectors in rural Ghana.

Dr. Grace Marquis – Social marketing as a means to build community engagement in nutrition-sensitive and nutrition-specific interventions

Carlos Andres Gallegos & Ms. Emily Lloyd – One Acre Fund: Scaling up smallholder farmers’ access to poultry in East Africa

Dr. Klaus Kraemer – Eggciting Innovations: Insights from Smallholder Poultry Models in East Africa and India

Sunday, October 15 

14:00 – 18:30

Scaling Up Rice Fortification in Latin America and the Caribbean
WFP & Regional Bureau for LATAM and the Caribbean, nutrition unit

Marc-André ProstScaling Up Rice Fortification in Latin America and the Caribbean: translating the evidence base into concrete plans for demand creation and effective programming at country level

Dr. Klaus Kraemer – The launch of the Sight and Life special supplement on Scaling Up Rice Fortification in Latin America and the Caribbean

Dr. Helena Pachón – Evidence generation for decision making and effective policy and program planning

Dr. Reena Das – Costa Rica: a successful regional model for mandatory rice fortification & National Plan for Rice Fortification in the framework of the Nation Plan for the Prevention of Micronutrient Deficiencies

Dr. Sonia Castro – National Plan for rice fortification and its commercialization in Nicaragua

Monday, October 16 

8:00 – 10:00 

Book Release: The Biology of the First 1,000 Days

Dr. Klaus Kraemer & Crystal D. Karakochuk – Session Co-Chairs and Editors of The Biology of the First 1,000 Days 

Dr. Philip James – Epigenetics, nutrition and infant health

Dr. Luz Maria De Regil – Before and beyond the 1,000 days: a role for preconception nutrition

Dr. Julian Lui – Nutritional regulation of the growth plate

Monday, October 16

11:30 – 13:30

Integration to Implementation on Vitamin A Intervention
Micronutrient Forum 

Dr. Danial Raiten – Scope of the problem and overview of the controversy; how the I to I approach will be applied

Dr. Sherry Tanumihardjo – Biological evidence for or against high does supplementation

Dr. Ermorn Udomkesmalee – Relative strengths & weaknesses of available interventions /programs strategies to prevent or improve vitamin A status n individuals or populations

MSc. Dora Inés Mazariegos – Country perspective. What are the implications of the current concern/debate on national efforts to prevent vitamin A deficiency in Guatemala?

Dr. Musonda Mofu – Country perspective. What are the implications of the current cancer/debate on national efforts to prevent vitamin A deficiency in Zambia?

Dr. Roland Kupka – What does it all mean and how might we move an agenda forward to address these challenges? 

Dr. Klaus Kraemer – What does it all mean and how might we move an agenda forward to address these challenges? 

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We welcome our new edition of the Sight and Life magazine focusing on food culture.

In this issue, we have curated contributions that explore the social and cultural domains of food choices and food experiences more broadly. We acknowledge that this is only part of the story. We promise to explore cognition (psychology, brain) and biology (evolution, genes, biochemistry) – factors that also drive food choices – in a future issue of the magazine. For some of our readers trained in biology or chemistry, culture may seem a fuzzy, perhaps non-scientific, topic. Be assured, however, that culture is as much part of nutrition as are biology, biochemistry, chemistry, and genes, and there is a rich body of research on nutrition and culture. 

Please enjoy perusing this issue of Sight and Life magazine with a curious mind, with a view to learning more about how a cultural perspective can enrich your nutrition research and programs.

Visit the resources page to find the complete issue and each individual article for downloading. The past editions of the Sight and Life magazine are available in resources

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Our latest supplement with the World Food Programme is full of information regarding rice fortification in Latin America. This comprehensive overview explains why fortifying rice with micronutrients can be part of an affordable, effective strategy to increase the intake of essential vitamins and minerals to reduce the prevalence of micronutrient malnutrition.

The supplement is available in English and Spanish. Visit the resources page to find the complete supplement and country profiles referenced in the publication for downloading. The past supplements are available in resources

 

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The Society for Implementation Science in Nutrition (SISN) hosted its first live webinar in June of 2017 entitled “An Integrative Framework for Implementation Science in Nutrition” presented by President, Dr. David Pelletier and moderated by Dr. Eva Monterrosa, Secretary and Treasurer of SISN and Sight and Life’s very own Scientific Manager. 

Whether you’re a researcher, policy-maker, front-line implementer or nutrition student, this webinar promotes a common understanding of core concepts in implementation science. It provides an integrative framework for implementation science and classification scheme for distinguishing among the many different forms and purposes of implementation while highlighting the need for implementers and researchers to collaborate to achieve impact-at-scale.

View the complete webinar by clicking HERE

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Maternal undernutrition continues to threaten maternal and child health – particularly in low income and food insecure environments. Despite recent progress, over 30 million babies are still born too small— putting them at an increased risk of infant mortality, childhood stunting and poor cognitive function later in life. Approximately six million of these births are associated with maternal short stature in pregnancy. Low maternal BMI and poor weight gain during pregnancy are other factors that lead to fetal growth restriction. While the importance of the first 1,000 days is widely known, there has been little attention given to a woman’s nutritional status during and following pregnancy. To address this, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation convened a group of experts to explore how to best meet the nutritional requirements of vulnerable women during pregnancy and lactation.
 
The consultation set out to capture considerations and consensus for ready-to-use food supplements for pregnant and lactating women who are undernourished and/or at risk of undernutrition in low and middle-income countries. In their report, the expert group assess the daily minimum and maximum macro- and micronutrient consumption amounts for this target demographic—drawing upon recommendations from the US Institute of Medicine, the Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization (WHO). The group considered the types of foods that can best deliver these nutrients, and consideration of different formats including spreads, biscuits, bars, extruded snacks and instant drink powders. Lastly, they assessed the roles that the public and private sectors could play to create access to and demand for nutritional food supplements during and after pregnancy. The group concluded that both sectors will have an important role to play in moving these products from concept to market, and ultimately getting them to the women who need them most.
 
Dr. Klaus Kraemer, Sight and Life’s Managing Director, was part of the expert panel to advance these pressing topics surrounding women’s nutrition. 
 
“This important and timely document provides a blueprint to develop nutritious foods for women of reproductive age in countries with the highest nutritional needs.” – Dr Klaus Kraemer
 
The new WHO antenatal care guidelines —released shortly after the consultation—filled a gap in guidance for supplementation during pregnancy. The new guidelines include a context-specific recommendation for balanced-energy protein supplementation for pregnant women in undernourished populations. This offers an exciting opportunity to develop an affordable, nutritious food supplement for pregnant women that could also be considered for use by postpartum women to support lactation.
 
Now we must put the consultation’s recommendations into action. The group has outlined a series of next steps, including the development and testing of prototypes in different geographies and contexts. The potential for delivering a nutritious food supplement to undernourished populations is significant, and can help drive progress towards achieving the World Health Assembly’s global nutrition targets on anemia and low birth weight. 

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FAO, WHO welcome resolution, leaps forward in galvanising action on nutrition. 

The United Nations General Assembly today agreed a resolution proclaiming the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition from 2016 to 2025.

The resolution aims to trigger intensified action to end hunger and eradicate malnutrition worldwide, and ensure universal access to healthier and more sustainable diets – for all people, whoever they are and wherever they live. It calls on governments to set national nutrition targets for 2025 and milestones based on internationally agreed indicators.

By agreeing to today’s resolution, governments endorsed the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and Framework for Action adopted by the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) in November 2014.

The UN resolution calls upon FAO and WHO to lead the implementation of the Decade of Action on Nutrition, in collaboration with the World Food Programme (WFP), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), and involving coordination mechanisms such as the United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition (SCN) and multi-stakeholder platforms such as the Committee on World Food Security (CFS).

The Framework for Action commits governments to exercise their primary role and responsibility for addressing undernourishment, stunting, wasting, underweight and overweight in children under five years of age, anaemia in women and children – among other micronutrient deficiencies. It also commits them to reverse the rising trends in overweight and obesity and reduce the burden of diet-related noncommunicable diseases in all age groups.

The new resolution invites international partners, civil society, private sector and academia to actively support governments to ensure full implementation of the steps outlined in the Rome Declaration and Framework for Action.

Looking ahead, the text requests the UN Secretary-General, FAO and WHO to provide progress reports to the UN General Assembly every two years.

The resolution is the fruit of almost 2 years of intense negotiations which started in 2014 and involved representatives of FAO and WHO Member Countries. As a first milestone, ministers and top officials from over 170 countries endorsed the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and Framework for action at the Second International Conference on Nutrition (Rome 19-21 November 2014). A second milestone was reached when the governing bodies of FAO and WHO endorsed the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and Framework for Action in 2015.

A third occurred when governments at the UN General Assembly welcomed these developments and agreed to consider next steps

Today’s resolution further enshrines the battle against hunger and all forms of malnutrition in the sustainable development agenda.

Editors note:
Nearly 800 million people remain chronically undernourished and 159 million children under 5 years of age are stunted. Approximately 50 million children under 5 years are wasted, over two billion people suffer from micronutrient deficiencies and 1.9 billion people are affected by overweight of which over 600 million are obese. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing in nearly all countries.

For more information:
2016
Resolution adopted by the UN General Assembly on the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016-2025)

2015
Resolution adopted by the UN General Assembly on the follow-up to the Second International Conference on Nutrition (A/RES/69/310)

Resolution adopted by the FAO Conference on the outcome of the Second International Conference on Nutrition

Resolution adopted by the WHO World Health Assembly on the outcome of the Second International Conference on Nutrition (WHA68.19)

2014
Rome Declaration on Nutrition adopted at the Second International Conference on Nutrition

Framework for Action adopted at the Second International Conference on Nutrition

 

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Gerda Verburg replaces Tom Arnold, the acting SUN Movement Coordinator

United Nations Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, today announced the appointment of Gerda Verburg of the Netherlands as the Coordinator of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement. The Coordinator will work with 56 country governments that lead the SUN movement, united with UN agencies, civil society, business and donors, in a common mission to defeat malnutrition in all its forms. 

Since 2011, Verburg has served as Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the UN Organizations for Food and Agriculture in Rome (FAO, WFP and IFAD) and in 2014 she was appointed Chair of the Global Agenda Council for Food and Nutrition Security of the World Economic Forum (WEF).  

From 2013 until 2015, Verburg served as Chair of the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS), a multi-stakeholder committee where governments, civil society, private sector, research institutions and others addressed food and nutrition issues.  

From 2007-2011, Verburg served as speaker in the Dutch House of Representatives on economics, energy and innovation and as Minister of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality. In 2008 she was elected Chair of the UN Commission on Sustainable Development.  

“I am delighted to have the opportunity to work with the 56 countries in the SUN Movement, as it enters its sixth year. They are home to over 90 million undernourished children. Our vision is to bring this down to zero.” – Verburg 

Verburg, replaces the acting SUN Movement Coordinator, Tom Arnold, who has Coordinated the Movement from August 2014. Previously, David Nabarro, the UN Secretary General’s Special Advisor on 2030 Agenda and Special Representative for Food Security and Nutrition, coordinated the Movement – helping to establish the powerful driving force for nutrition which it is today.

Click here to learn more about the SUN Movement.

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