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Sir Jack Cecil Drummond DSc, FRIC, FRS

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What might a visionary and public-spirited nutrition scientist reasonably expect fr om a lifetime’s work? Intellectual challenge, certainly: the chance to make new discoveries that might transform our understanding of the world. Infl uence, as well: the opportunity to translate new scientifi c fi ndings into policy recommendations that change our approach to existing problems. One could add: the companionship of like minds; the pleasures of writing, lecturing and publication; the stimulation of travel; the prospect of recognition; even the hope of honors. But being murdered would not be on the list. To be more precise: being murdered together with your wife and ten-year-old daughter by the side of a road in the middle of a hot August night in the south of France. That, surely, would not be on the wish-list of any budding nutrition scientist. Such, however, was the fate of the British biochemist Sir Jack Cecil Drummond (1891–1952). Exactly sixty years ago, on the night of 4–5 August 1952, he and his wife Anne were shot by the side of the French route nationale N96 in Lurs with a Rock-Ola carbine, a rifl e used by US servicemen during World War II. Seven shots were heard to ring out at around 1:10 am. Their daughter Elizabeth was bludgeoned to death with the butt of the rifl e in an attack so violent that the stock came apart fr om the barrel. L’Aff aire Dominici News of this savage triple murder spread instantly. Journalists fl ocked to the scene of the crime, destroying potentially valuable evidence before the site could be secured by the police and examined by forensic experts. The murder of the British scientist and his family was blamed on a local French peasant of Italian extraction, one Gaston Dominici, and the aff air became known in France as “l’Aff aire Dominici.”

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Key Details

Year 2012
Authors Jonathan Steffen
Language English
Keywords
DOI https://doi.org/10.52439/FINN2524
DOI Number 10.52439/FINN2524
ISBN
ISSN

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