Search
Generic filters
Published Year
Country
Resource Hub
Select all
Magazines
Annual Reports
Articles
Blogs
Podcasts
Videos
Webinars
Single Video
Search
Generic filters
Published Year
Country
Resource Hub
Select all
Magazines
Annual Reports
Articles
Blogs
Podcasts
Videos
Webinars
Single Video

Sustainable Food Systems for a Healthy World

  • PREVIEW
  • READ ARTICLE
  • OPEN PDF

ISSN

What are “sustainable food systems for a healthy world”? This  question of course involves three concepts, all warranting discussion: “sustainable,” “food systems” and “healthy world.” I feel it helps to address them in reverse order, dealing first with  the concept “healthy world” – arguably the ultimate goal.

Many concerned with global environmental change, whether as academics or as the “interested public,” may first think of  biological, bio geo chemical and/or biophysical parameters to define the concept “healthy world.” Much has been published on the “state of the planet” in this vein, with recent major works by international bodies such as the IPCC on climate and UNEP’s International Resource Panel on natural resources. These  have been accompanied by numerous major papers in the academic literature which introduced, for instance, the concepts of “Planetary Boundaries” and a “Safe Operating Space for Humanity.”1,2

Environmental concerns are clearly important, but only represent one view of a “healthy world.” Another relates to the health of the human population, which has risen dramatically in recent decades. This is partially due to increased longevity – a development which few would argue is a bad thing. Further, the fact that now more than six billion people – or approximately 80% of the world’s population – do not suffer from inadequate calorie intake is a remarkable human achievement; some 50 years ago,
this proportion was approximately 65%.3 But we should not be complacent: today some one billion people do not have access to sufficient calories4 and at least two billion people lack sufficient micronutrients,5 while – paradoxically – over two billion people consume too many calories.6 This under- and over-consumption has led to a growing “triple burden” of malnutrition. Different, overlapping forms of malnutrition are the “new normal”;7 some people consume too little, while others – sometimes in the same community or even household – consume too much.

Please wait while flipbook is loading. For more related info, FAQs and issues please refer to DearFlip WordPress Flipbook Plugin Help documentation.

Key Details

Year 2016
Authors John Ingram
Language English
Keywords
DOI https://doi.org/10.52439/JDKV3324
DOI Number 10.52439/JDKV3324
ISBN
ISSN

For all devoted to nutrition.

Discover the science behind nutrition and our latest initiatives for a promising tomorrow.​

Register Now

You have successfully Registered to the Event

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

Sight and Life will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing.