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The 2019 summer conference season opened in an intense way for me. With barely one intervening week, I had the privilege of attending two fascinating conferences that differed in most aspects but converged on the complementary pathways towards the common and ultimate goal of a better-nourished and healthier world.

Reflections from Baltimore

The first conference was Nutrition 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, hosted in Baltimore, home to Johns Hopkins University, one of the leading nutrition research institutions in the world. Five intense days with hundreds of lectures, presentations, panels and posters organized in themes ranging from cellular and physiological metabolism to global and public health nutrition. As expected, great learning and networking, accompanied by the recurring wish one could multiply oneself so as not to miss one or more exciting parallel sessions. Nearly 3,500 participants from scores of countries, albeit with diminished participation from Africa and Asia compared to last year’s edition. I had the opportunity to present a poster on complementary food safety and quality in Rwanda (poster shown below), the detailed content of which was recently published in Maternal & Child Nutrition.

A few topics stood out. Perhaps the most emergent was the microbiome, a theme that has now migrated from the margins to the center of clinical and translational nutrition. The most thought-provoking microbiome presentation in my view was by Dan Knights from the University of Minnesota. In a panel titled “You Are What Your Microbes Eat” exploring the interplay between diets and the gut microbiome, he borrowed from physics the metaphor of dark matter to describe the countless compounds present in foods that are not captured on any nutrition label yet strongly influence microbiome composition and metabolism. Intriguingly, responses of specific gut microbes to the same foods are often different from person to person, pointing to the need for a personalized approach to the microbiome and nutrition and mirroring the emergence of nutrigenomics and personalized nutrition, another salient topic in the conference.

Sustainability was another theme on the move towards the mainstream of nutrition, certainly influenced by the EAT-Lancet Food in the Anthropocene report[i]. The challenges of nudging consumers and food systems towards healthy diets and sustainability, and the multiple tradeoffs involved, were highlighted in several sessions, including a dense panel discussion moderated by Klaus Kraemer, Managing Director of Sight and Life, and Eileen Kennedy, Dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.

A special event, rich in historical perspective and fond memories, was the Kellogg Prize for Lifetime Achievements in International Nutrition Lectureship. Marie Ruel, Director of IFPRI’s Poverty, Health, and Nutrition Division, was this year’s prize recipient, recognized for her outstanding work of more than 25 years on policies and programs to alleviate poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition in developing countries. What made the ceremony particularly touching was the presence of many other leaders in the field who were mentors, colleagues, or mentees of Marie’s, a testimony to the expanse and depth of her contributions.

My overall perception of the field, partly from having attended both the 2018 and 2019 editions of ASN, is that it is currently in a stage of incremental and relatively modest advances; areas such as the microbiome and personalized nutrition show tantalizing promise, yet they involve complex science in its early stages, which likely implies a translational pathway a few years long, not to mention translational challenges to low-resource contexts.

Impressions from Hyderabad

The second conference was the Agriculture, Nutrition & Health (ANH) Academy Week 2019. Held in Hyderabad, the bustling and sprawling high tech hub of Southern India, this was a much smaller and more intimate event of about 400 participants from a broad array of food system-related disciplines. It was the Academy Week’s fourth edition, the previous ones having been held in Addis Ababa, Kathmandu and Accra. The first two days were dedicated to learning labs, followed by a three-day research conference. Overall, a superb interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral gathering that stretched participants’ world views and thinking across boundaries.

Srujith Lingala of Sight and Life participating during ANH.

And it was the progress in the interdisciplinary dialogue on food systems that impressed me the most. We have been talking about ag-nutrition integration for a few years now, but the road has been bumpy and uphill, with dissonances ranging from language to priorities and expectations. It felt so much smoother and fluid at this Academy Week. To me, this gathering was one among a number of signals that we are now reaching an upland in which we can switch gears towards more integrative thinking and holistic approaches to the food system. These refined approaches incorporate not just nutrition and health but also sustainability – now inextricably linked with agriculture –, equity and socioeconomic development, while acknowledging the need for inclusive governance to co-create win-wins and negotiate inevitable tradeoffs with fairness. The good research presented at the conference included innovative tools (such as Agrifood) to facilitate the complex and consequential decision-making involved.

ANH, Acedemic Week, India, Nutrition, Agriculture
Group photo from Agriculture, Nutrition & Health (ANH) Academy Week 2019 held in Hyderabad, India.

Final Thoughts

I thus stepped into the second half of 2019 with renewed optimism from these two conferences and the complementary and increasingly convergent learning agendas they represent. Health system-based approaches and the first thousand-day focus remain vital, but are insufficient to address the multiple burdens of malnutrition. Food system-based approaches can benefit the whole population from cradle to grave, spanning the food insecurity-malnutrition spectrum and addressing other dimensions also relevant to nutrition outcomes. With these two wings in tandem, we will be able rise faster towards a better-nourished, healthier, fairer, and more sustainable world.

For additional pictures from ASN visit here and for ANH visit here

[i] Willet et al., “Food in the Anthropocene: the EAT–Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems”. Lancet 2019; 393: 447–92.